Someone Like Me

 

the sign representing the disabled

 

This poem is dedicated to anyone who may have a disability of any sort. Whether you are blind, deaf, wheelchair bound, have cerebral palsy, are autistic, an amputee, mentally disabled, etc, this poem is for you. We all deserved to be loved for who we are on the inside, not what people see on the outside. Love comes from the heart, not the eyes.

 

This poem was written specifically from my heart, but it represents all disabled people, and how we feel about how we are treated because of our disability. Men and women alike can relate to this poem. If you have ever been rejected in love because of your disability, this is for you. Know that you are worthy of love, and the right person will come along and see that.

 

You say I’m beautiful and sexy

But you could never be with someone like me

The fact that I can’t physically see

Makes me unworthy

Of being your girl

Or a part of your world

You like that I am intelligent

But the fact that I am blind makes it irrelevant

My personality turns you on

But for your image I am so wrong

You have a misconception

That my disability is an imperfection

My inability to see makes me less than

A real woman for a so-called real man

I am good enough for you to fuck

But at the thought of being with me you buck

What would your friends and family say?

If I had the fortune to meet them one day

Or would I just be your little secret

Your girl when convenient

If you really got to know me

Then you would clearly see

That just because I am different

Doesn’t mean you have to be ignorant

There is a whole lot more to me

Like love, compassion, and loyalty

Having a disability has its challenges

But doesn’t everyone have their own imbalances?

I am just as good as anyone else

I do my own thing, I take care of myself

But to you I am only just half a woman

So to love me is something you couldn’t

I’m independent

Not easily offended

By your lack of interest

Or hesitance for a commitment

But at the end of the day

No matter what you think or say

I know what I am worth

A blessing on this earth

A real man will see me

And know that I am worthy

Of being his girl

A part of his world

It will be your lost

Too late to defrost

Your cold closed heart

Since you didn’t want to take part

To see what could happen

For this you were slacking

So closed minded

By shallowness you were blinded

Oh I’m not angry you see

Because you missed an opportunity

To have someone like me in your life

As your girlfriend or even a wife

You left room for the next man

To get in where he can

Because he has no shame to be

With someone like me

 

 

 

Blind People and Computers

 

Picture of a computer screen

 

Those two words don’t even belong in the same sentence. Are you crazy? Blind people can’t use computers. They can’t see, so how can they use a computer? There isn’t any braille on a computer, so they can’t use one. You must be nuts. Maybe you may need your head examined for you to think such a preposterous thing. These are just some of the things people may say to you when you tell them that blind people indeed can use computers. How is that you wonder? Simple. An assistive technology software called a screen reader.

 

And what is a screen reader you ask? It is a software that converts the text on a computer screen into synthesized speech for a blind or visually impaired person. Whatever text is on the screen, this screen reader will read the text back to the person in speech. So, the text has been converted to speech that is spoken aloud. This can be pretty distracting or annoying for someone who is not used to this type of technology, so to be courteous the blind or visually impaired person uses headphones to listen to the speech in privacy. They don’t want the wrong person hearing the wrong thing, right? Especially, the naughty email that they plan to send to their spouse. LOL. Unfortunately though, not all blind people are courteous, so sometimes you will hear their annoying synthesized computer voice while you’re trying to watch your favorite TV show, or driving to your nearest destination. There are different configurations that can be done to make the software more personalized for the user. Everyone doesn’t use a computer the same, so they can alter the settings to fit their personal needs.

 

The blind or visually impaired person types the same way that any person with sight does. With this text to speech software, what they type is spoken aloud letter by letter. Depending on how fast of a typist they are, the words or letters can be spoken fast or slow. As a blind person myself, this technology has made life a lot easier for me. I am an author, so having access to a computer is very important to my success. The fact that we can do a lot of the same things that a person who can see can do on a computer is marvelous. We can search the web, send emails, create word documents or excel spread sheets, and anything else we want. Of course, it takes some training to figure out how to use this technology. You’re not going to wake up blind tomorrow and be able to install the software on your computer and just be able to use it. No. It doesn’t work like that. It requires a lot of time and patience. There are so many keystrokes to learn and commands to do things that a person with sight would just do with a mouse.

 

Technology has advanced so much that this assistive technology is now available on mobile phones. Yes, blind people do use phones also thanks to this awesome text to speech software. Majority of blind or visually impaired mobile phone users are I phone users. Apple had the bright idea to design their products with the disabled in mind. Instead of having to buy a screen reader software, Apple has their own built-in screen reading software called Voice Over already installed on any Apple product they make. Having a screen reader software on a mobile phone is similar to how it works on a computer. Of course, the commands and keystrokes have been adapted for touch screen use though. Instead of learning commands, the blind or visually impaired person learns touch screen gestures to get what they need done. Before phone companies started including assistive technology already built into their phones, blind and visually impaired people had to buy a separate screen reader software and install it on the phone so that they would be able to use it like a person with sight does.

 

Some of the popular screen readers for computers are JAWS, which is an acronym meaning job access with speech, Window-eyes, Voice over for apple computers, NVDA, which is an acronym for non-visual desktop access, and a pre-installed software on windows computers called narrator. On mobile phones, the popular choices for screen readers are Voice Over for I phones and Talk-Back for android phones. Narrator, NVDA, and Voice Over are free screen readers, but there is a price for JAWS and Window-eyes. To access Voice Over or Talk-Back on mobile phones, all you have to do is go to the settings section of your phone and find accessibility, then click on the text to speech software for which ever phone you have to turn it on, and there you go! Your phone is now able to speak whatever text is on the screen. If you are familiar with the voice of the GPS in your car, then that is what a screen reader sounds like. Beware though, that means you can no longer hide those dirty text messages from your secret lover that you thought your blind spouse couldn’t read, because they actually can. So, if I were you, I would start deleting them really quick.

 

Well, now that you know that blind people can use computers and you’re not crazy, what else can they do with them? Yeah, yeah, yeah. We can send emails, create word documents, and surf the web. Is that all? Of course not! Thanks to screen reader software, blind and visually impaired people can keep up with the latest and greatest. We can shop online, post to social media such as Facebook and twitter, and read online magazines and newspapers. We can even fill out online applications, take online courses, and so much more. I can even type this post I am typing now for this blog. See how amazing it is? Lol.  Thanks to advancement in technology, we are able to keep up with the best of you. No more running circles around the little blind woman, because she is running right beside you. Want to watch a YouTube video? Well, I can too. Let’s check the menu of the hottest Italian restaurant in town! I can do that too. Assistive technology has made all of this possible. Now, if only they can work on that car for the blind. I will be first in line to receive my driver’s license. I’ll see you on the road! So, the next time someone asks you if a blind person can use a computer, your answer should be, of course they can!

 

I hope you enjoyed this fun and informative article about how a totally blind or visually impaired person can use a computer, despite their vision loss. I always like to educate others who are not informed on the way I and other blind and visually impaired people live our daily lives. Life had to be adapted to fit our situations, but thanks to the adaptation, we are able to live life just as anyone else does. It has been an interesting learning journey for me, and I’m looking forward to see what else technology has in store for the blind and visually impaired people of the world.

 

 

Rising Star: Maureen Mckenzie

 

Hello everyone, today, I am featuring rising star Maureen Mckenzie AKA Rosy. She is an up-and-coming poet from the United Kingdom. She is very talented, and I see her going far with her unique poetic style.

 

Blind Seasons

By Maureen Mckenzie

 

What a thing the spring

The pretty daffodils … where?

If only for a few days and hours

The lovely smell…

That newness

The dew, the damp, cool rain…

To whirl and bring warmth again

I feel it, not see it

It’s ok. I love it

I know it’s spring…

Now, it’s summer

There’s a bummer!

It’s too hot. Is it not?

No air conditioning here

Oh, dear!

The warmth through my feet

Wearing sandals, what a treat!

Walking in the sea

As the tide comes in

Now, there a thing

I feel it, not see it

It’s ok. I love it

I know it’s summer

So, autumn

Here you are

The door is ajar

The leaves are rustling

Everyone is hustling!

Getting ready for Christmas!

No! It’s too early

But the leaves are all twirly

Colorful aren’t they?

I feel it, not see it

It’s ok. I love it

I know it’s autumn

Winter, oh burrrr it’s cold!

It’s grey out there

So I’m told…

It’s all festive with Christmas joy

I love that feeling … oh boy!

Snow crunch on ground

Ok it’s found

The white stuff under my toes

With cold it glows

I feel it, not see it

It’s ok. I love it

I know it’s winter

I can feel it, hear it

Touch it

Sense it

it’s here

it’s ok.

Isn’t it?

What’s that you are saying…?

You don’t need sight to have vision

But isn’t that a division?

Though

Between light and dark

What a lark!

But I’m ok…

 

 

 

Globalization, me dear!

By Maureen Mckenzie

 

I think the time has come near

When we must hold dear

This much we must dare

And be bold and to share

Every creed, color, religion, and nation

Without any frustration

Good will and love

Does shine down from above

But our planet is heaving

And no one is leaving

There is no escape

We have made many a mistake

In our evolution

Without thought or solution

The planet needs saving

Whilst new IPhones we are craving

The water is rising

The sun hotly shining

As icebergs melt

Depleting ozone is felt

People rush round

Much importance is found

In activity trivial

Nonsensical ritual

Wars never ending

With no peace transcending

Nuclear war could transpire

That would destroy every desire

In one moment we’d be gone

There would be no song

So, wouldn’t it be better for us?

To not make so much fuss

And our differences put aside

So no one need hide

Globalization must bring us together

Because none of us are really that clever

So, do you have an idea?

To work this all out me dear!

 

Bio:

 

I was once a visual artist who painted. I still have my art displayed in galleries as a visually impaired artist today, but now since losing most of my eyesight over the past few years to glaucoma, I have started to write poetry.  People often said to me it would be a good idea to write a diary to share my feelings of sight loss, but I feel writing words in prose is more effective and a better way for me to portray my creativity. Some say poetry should always rhyme, but I think this is true to a certain extent, but not necessary all the time

 

My poem Blind Seasons has to do with the four seasons… and sight loss… reality, and that is mine. I have 10% optic nerve left in each eye.

 

If you would like to check out more of Maureen’s work, visit her blog at Rosy Poems. I’m sure you will find a poem or two that will pull at your heart strings.

 

Author Q and A: Bj Edwards

picture of author BJ Edwards

 

Hello everyone. Today, I have the pleasure of speaking with author BJ Edwards. I love to travel, but I never thought I would get the chance to take a virtual trip to visit the United Kingdom.

 

BJ: Thank you so much for having me Blaque Diamond. You should really take a trip out here. I’m sure you will find it a fascinating place to visit.

 

Blaque: I just might have to do that. The United Kingdom is a place on my bucket list that I would love to visit in my lifetime.

 

BJ: I would love to give you a tour.

 

Blaque: Awww! That’s so sweet of you. I would really like that. So, I would like to talk to you and see who you are behind your title of author.

 

Bj: There is a lot about me that people may not know.

 

Blaque: I’m sure there is. It is a great opportunity for readers to get to know you more. So, lets get started. How many books have you published to date?

 

BJ: I have had three books published to date, not including poems that have crept into anthologies. I also write plays and screenplays, some of which have been produced or published. I have a number of books waiting to be published, but publishers work very slowly!

 

Blaque: That’s awesome! What kind of child were you growing up?

 

BJ: Well, this is tricky. I suppose I was curious and creative. I asked a lot of questions and wanted to know everything I could. I always had a strong imagination which I channelled into play, then art, then into the creation of my own stories and characters.

 

Blaque: What makes you uniquely you?

 

BJ: At this point I should say that everyone is unique. That said, I am totally blind, I have been visually impaired all my life, so I guess it has given me a unique perspective. Allied to this, I am passionately devoted to fitness and exercise. So, I guess I am a hybrid – someone who loves books, art and theatre, and someone who loves sweating, sport and martial arts!

 

Blaque: Oh Wow! We have something in common. I am also totally blind. I haven’t been visually impaired all my life, but I am now, and I have adjusted to my new life quite well. So, if you were granted three wishes, what would they be?

 

BJ: Firstly, I would wish that one of my scripts or books would be turned into a film, that would be amazing. Secondly, I would wish that I had a part in a Star Wars film. I mean, a proper part with a lightsaber! Thirdly, I wish that I could direct one of my own plays at a West End theatre. Yes, I know, these are all really selfish, and I should have wished for world peace, or Donald Trump to spontaneously combust or something. But this is unashamedly about me!

 

Blaque: Another thing we have in common I see. Lol. I too would like to see my books performed on a stage and shown on the big screen. That would be awesome! Now, I know how I deal with writer’s block, but how do you deal with writer’s block?

 

BJ: I always make sure I am working on more than one project. In essence, I make sure I am juggling more than two balls, so if I drop one, I can carry on. So, I always try to have a story or book to write, or a play or script to write or edit. This way I can still be productive if I’ve completely ran out of steam in another project.

 

Blaque: Out of the books you have published, which is your favourite and why?

 

BJ: Stalking The Shadows will always be special to me. It’s complex, multi-layered and was difficult to write. It deals with so many passions of mine; magic, battle, anthropology, theology, fantasy. I loved writing it, and love so many of the characters.

 

Blaque: Where do you get most of your story ideas?

 

BJ: Some stories start life as an emotion, a tincture of feeling that I want to communicate. Others start off from a dream, or a character or event. The key is to give the seed of an idea time to grow. Sometimes an idea will become a poem, sometimes it will become a storey or a play, and sometimes it will grow and evolve a life of its own and become a novel. Ideas are everywhere, fragments of wonder that float amongst us. The key is to capture it, take care of it, nurture it and allow it to fuse with your mind and soul.

 

Blaque: What advice would you give someone who aspires to be an author?

 

BJ: Just write. Practice and enjoy. Write for yourself, for your own enjoyment and satisfaction. Writing can be deeply personal and therapeutic, it can make you happy, elated, excited or sad. Poor emotion and imagination into your writing, and don’t get bogged down in thinking about getting published. Just write, and if you’re determined enough, or lucky enough, somebody else will enjoy your words and invest in them.

 

Blaque: What is your zodiac sign?

 

BJ: My zodiac sign is Sagittarius.

 

Blaque: Who is your favourite author and why?

 

BJ: This is tough, I admire so many authors. If someone was to hold a gun to my head, I would have to say Bernard Cornwell. He is consistently excellent, and his research is exemplary. I adore so much of what he writes.

 

Blaque: Do you have any other talents besides writing?

 

BJ: I am a little bit musical. I play the piano, clarinet, saxophone, and sing.

 

Blaque: What is your biggest fear?

 

BJ: Failure is my biggest fear.

 

Blaque: If your best friend could describe you in one word, what would it be?

 

BJ: I’ll actually text him and ask…. back in a few minutes… Ok, he said, “Contrasting.”

 

Blaque: When you’re not writing, what do you enjoy doing in your spare time?

 

BJ: I go to the gym everyday – in fact, I try to train for about two hours a day. I love rowing and cycling. I also love going to the theatre, watching films, music and reading. I also collect swords.

 

Blaque: What did you want to be when you grew up?

 

BJ: When I was really small, I wanted to be an ice cream man! Then I wanted to be an archaeologist, then an actor. I ended up being an English teacher, before taking up writing seriously.

 

Blaque: Are you a dog or a cat person?

 

BJ: Dogs all the way. I have a big black Labrador guide dog called Oliver. Though, my first pet was a cat called Bill, and my second pet was a Yorkshire terrier called Loo-Loo!

 

Blaque: What is your goal as an author?

 

BJ: Bestselling books are seldom the best written books. My goal is to get more books published, and work with progressively bigger publishers. It would be good to get my work out into more book shops. It would be nice to come across someone on a train and notice they are reading one of my books.

 

Blaque: If you could talk to your younger self, what would you tell it?

 

BJ: “You know, life is often pretty hard. Sometimes it’s like pushing a boulder uphill whilst wearing roller skates. But keep on trying, keep on working, keep believing and never give-up. Find the beauty in everyday things, and life just might work out Ok.”

 

Blaque: What is your all-time favourite book?

 

BJ: Tricky. The book that had the most profound effect on me was Wilbur Smith’s Sunbird. The book that moves me the most is Cry The Beloved Country.

 

Blaque: What is your most favourite season of the year, and why?

 

BJ: Autumn. There’s a very interesting energy to the changing of the season, the falling of the leaves and the sun as it dips lower and burns more fitfully. The smell of wood smoke, the crunch of leaves, the knowledge that Winter waits, and that bonfires will soon be coaxed into life.

 

Blaque: Very interesting interview. It was nice to see that we have some things in common.

 

BJ: Yes, I wanted to give readers a deeper sense of who I am.

 

Blaque: That I can tell. I’m sure they found out some things about you today that they never knew. So, where can your books be purchased?

 

BJ: Readers can purchase my book Stalking The Shadows: Ancient Destiny Book 1 on

 

Audible

 

It is available as an EBook and an audio book. They can also purchase my book Tesserae from Amazon in EBook or paperback versions.

 

Blaque: Where can readers find you on social media?

 

BJ: They can find me here

 

Twitter

Facebook

 

Blaque: Are you also a blogger?

 

BJ: yes, my blog can be found at

 

BJ’s WordPress blog

 

Blaque: And your website?

 

BJ: My website can be found at

 

BJ’s Website

 

Blaque: Well, everyone, I hope you enjoyed getting to know just a little bit more about author BJ Edwards. Be sure to check out his publications. If you are a fan of historical fiction, poetry, or fantasy, then I’m sure you will find some amazing adventures in his books.

 

BJ: It was a pleasure speaking with you today Blaque Diamond.

 

Blaque: The pleasure was all mine. Thanks for having me. I’m going to hold you to that tour of the UK.

 

BJ: I’m a man of my word.

 

Blaque: Until next time. Happy writing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coming to the Light

A picture of open french doors with light spilling through

I never would’ve guessed that my last fight would be the very last fight of my life. On March 14th, 2005 was the day that my life would be forever changed in a dramatic way. I got into an altercation with my brother, and it caused me to be where I am today, and where I will probably be for the rest of my life. At the tender age of fourteen, I got into a fist fight with my brother, and this time it wasn’t like our usual fights. I would walk away the loser of much more than just the fight, but also my sight.

I was already partially blind due to mal-practice at birth, but I still had good vision. I was not considered legally blind because I still had perfect vision in the “good eye.” I wore glasses to keep that eye strong. My retina had been detached in the right eye during my birth due to the doctors mishandling of the forceps, so my vision was already delicate. I didn’t find out why I couldn’t see out of that eye until I was an adult. I had always been told that my optic nerves never developed in that eye. I also developed a cataract in that eye at the age of five due to the trauma to the eye.

My brother and I got into the fight over a radio because of me changing the station that was playing. For most people, this is probably such a trivial thing to fight over, but in the violent household and environment that we were living in, this was the norm. Since my brother did not like the fact that I had changed the channel on the radio, he became enraged with me. We began to fight for the radio. He hauled off and punched me in the eye, and I immediately saw red dots. I thought that maybe my eye had been cut and that I was bleeding in my eye. I thought that it was just a minor injury and that I would be back to normal in no time, but I was wrong. That one punch caused me to be in darkness for the rest of my life.

After the fight was over, I tried telling my family that I was having trouble seeing, but I wasn’t believed. My sight did not go away right away, but it was the start of the damage. Losing the vision in that eye happened over time until I woke up one day and couldn’t see anything. When my mother finally did take me serious and took me to the doctor, it was found that it was too late. They could do nothing to fix my vision. Too much time had passed, and the tissue of the eye had already started scarring over. Since it took my mother seven months to get me help for my vision, the doctors didn’t hold up much hope of me getting any of my sight back. Surgeries were performed to see if it would make a difference, but sadly it was useless. From that one fist punch, my retina had become detached and the damage was irreversible. At that point, I felt life was now not worth living for me since I could no longer see.

My self-esteem took a huge nose dive. I felt that I would never be able to live a normal life. The only people that I had ever seen that were blind were elderly people and that happened with age. I thought that I was too young to be blind, and I went into a deep depression. So many scary thoughts were going through my mind. I kept replaying that day over and over wishing that I could rewind the hands of time and do it all over again. Well, my reality was that I couldn’t get a redo, so I had to deal with the circumstances that I was left to deal with. Not having any family support didn’t make the transition any easier either. I was left to deal with this tragedy all on my own.

Over the years, I learned to adapt to my new situation once I finally got out of my depression phase. It was a long and treacherous journey filled with many nights of tears and self-pity. I had to take a hard look at myself and my situation and wonder if I wanted to be that cripple or disabled girl that had to have someone do her basic needs for her, and I knew that was not the life I wanted for myself. So, I began to embrace my new life and learn all that I needed to know so I could live a normal and happy life. I learned braille, computers with the aid of text to speech software, independent living skills, and how to travel alone with a white cane. These skills were very necessary for me to live the life I wanted. I took on every new task with gusto because I was determined to be as independent as I possibly could. I didn’t want to feel like a burden to anyone, and I wanted to be able to take care of myself with minimal assistance.

There were times when I just wanted to give up, but whenever I would think of the outcome if I didn’t push myself, it made me go even harder to learn all that I needed to know. I would always think of people who had other disabilities that were worse than mine, and I would think that I was lucky to just be blind. Even though I could no longer see physically, I could still walk, talk, feed myself, think for myself, and all the other great body functions we take for granted. I felt that things could’ve been worse and I know that I am blessed. I eventually started mentoring people who were just like me. They were struggling with the life that they now had to live because of their visual impairment. Before going blind myself, I would have never known that there were millions of people all over the world just like me young and old dealing with the same situation. Some weren’t taking it so great like I was at one time and others were taking it in stride. So, I look at my situation as a blessing in disguise. I could’ve died that night, but instead god had other plans for me.

I enjoy encouraging other blind and visually impaired people to become as independent as they possibly can. I always like to say, “Just because society sees us as being handicapped and unable to do for ourselves, doesn’t mean that we must live up to that standard or stigma that is placed upon us.” I take pride in knowing that I can do for myself despite what others may think or say because they are not in my situation. It took a while for me to get to where I am today in my thinking, but I am glad that I experienced all that I have in life because it made me the person that I am today. I wouldn’t change one thing about my past because if I did, then I probably wouldn’t be the same person that everyone knows and loves. My faith has a lot to do with how I got through my situation and remain positive about it. I feel that god doesn’t make any mistakes in our lives, so what happened to me must have happened for a specific purpose.

Now, I’m not going to lie and say that life is easy because of course it’s not. I still struggle everyday with the fact that I can’t experience some of the day to day activities that most people who can see take for granted. Driving for example; I would love to be able to drive myself to and from work every day. I would also like to be able to go into a grocery store and pick out my own items without the assistance of someone. Going out to a place that I am not familiar with without assistance from someone who can see is something that I also wish I could do, but I am thankful for the blessings that I do have. There are some out here in the world who have it a lot worse than I do. I get frustrated from time to time when I must depend on someone who can see to read stuff for me or help me fill out paperwork, but that is minor compared to the circumstances that others must go through on a daily basis.

As of right now, there is no cure or treatment for my eye condition, but I have faith that one day there will be a way for me to regain my sight. If that day never comes, then I am comfortable in who and what I am. I have adapted to my life just fine and enjoy all the many blessings that god has bestowed upon me. I do not let my disability stop me from living and enjoying all that life has to offer. My life had to be adapted to fit my new situation of being blind, but with the way technology is, it makes it a fun and great learning experience for me. I had to come to the light by accepting who I now am and loving myself despite my circumstance. Every negative occurrence doesn’t have to be a tragedy. Sometimes things happen for a reason because life is something we have no guarantees in.

As an author, my visual impairment does throw up some road blocks that I have no control over. For instance, I have to depend on people to design my book covers and my website for me. I tell them what I imagine my items to look like, but the fact that I can’t see them for myself makes me have to trust their creative skills. I do have someone close to me check them out for me, but in these instances I have to go on what someone else thinks. As someone who used to be into graphics and drawing, the fact that I don’t have that ability anymore sometimes does get to me. Being artistic was a gift that I was proud of, but now I have to use the artistic talents of someone else to get my message across the way I picture it. The fact that I have seen before makes it easy to tell someone how I want something to look, but it still isn’t the same as me designing what I picture myself. When you have a visual impairment, you have to learn to trust people. There are things in life that having a visual impairment will alter, but there are ways to get around it. Everyone needs someone else for something since no one is totally independent and able to do everything themselves. Having that knowledge brings me relief and makes it easier for me to accept my circumstances and live life to the best of my ability.

I shared my story to encourage and inspire those who may be struggling with circumstances in life that they may feel have made them lose hope in themselves. There is still hope if you have faith in god and in yourself. You may see a situation in your life as a mountain or hill that is too steep for you to climb, but all you have to do is step back and evaluate your situation and figure out a new way to accomplish that task. Look at your situation in a positive light instead of as a bad thing. What could’ve happened to make your situation worse? For me the other outcome would’ve been death, so for me losing my sight was a minor inconvenience than losing my life. Every situation won’t be that easy to look at in a positive way, but to grow and accomplish whatever you are trying to succeed at you must see the light at the end of the tunnel.